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  • Post Time POSTED JUNE 12, 2018
A short history of tinctures
 
The history of tinctures is rich in texture. Humans have been using tinctures since 1000 AD when alcohol was first distilled by the ancient Egyptians. After distilling alcohol became common practice, using the mixture to preserve plants and create plant-based medicine soon followed. For therapeutic reasons, cannabis infusion has over time become one of the most popular tinctures.1
 
While there are a number of cannabis companies that sell tinctures, perhaps the easiest way to medicate with this means is to employ a DIY attitude. For their simplicity, it can actually save time and money to make tinctures at home. All that’s needed to prepare one in the kitchen is cannabis, a jar, alcohol, and a strainer.2
 
 
According to one recipe, the “green dragon tincture recipe,” a simple tincture preparation involves a truly rudimentary process. Once decarboxylated, the whole flowers can be mixed in a mason jar with alcohol. Once mixed, the mason jar should be left to sit for a number of weeks, shaking the jar once a day. The process is completed by filtering the plant material from the tincture and dosing accordingly.
 
For nearly 100 years, tinctures have served as a beacon of hope and relief to medical cannabis patients the world over. As one of the first cannabis treatment options actively marketed and used by patients, tinctures have remained an effective means of medicating, even as new extracts and products have come onto the market.
 
In fact, there was a time when tinctures represented the most popular form of consuming cannabis. Until prohibition was introduced in the early 1900s, cannabis tinctures were ubiquitous, available at most local pharmacies. Because of its rapid onset, and ability to treat both acute and chronic conditions, tinctures were traditionally viewed as a non-abrasive means of medicating.3
 
For a few reasons, tinctures present a safe treatment option for patients. Combustion and inhalation of flower cannabis can translate into the unnecessary consumption of toxins and
irritants. Because tinctures are absorbed sublingually – under the tongue – they make an ideal product for patients with compromised immune systems. While tinctures are consumed for recreational use, the practice is quite rare.
 
Like most contemporary cannabis products, tinctures are a versatile alternative to traditional medicine. Tinctures are available in a range of concentrations of THC, CBD, and other lesser cannabinoids, and can be consumed discreetly. Though they can be highly potent, tinctures can also have a non-psychoactive CBD base, and be used to microdose throughout the day.
 
In addition to an extremely rapid onset, the sublingual delivery method of a tincture sets it at an advantage over other cannabis products, exclusively in terms of medicating with the plant’s
extracts. Where a tincture continues to hold almost uncanny cache is in the fact that it can be taken alongside food and drink, depending on what the mix preference is.
 
There are hundreds of tincture recipes available to medical patients these days. While the overall interest in tinctures has unquestionably waned over the last century, the number of patients using them to treat their conditions has stayed consistent. The quick onset, sublingual delivery and potency of a tincture continue to make it a safe and healthy cannabis treatment option.

References:
1. “Herbal tinctures 101.” https://www.bulkherbstore.com/blog/herbal-tinctures-101/
2. “What are cannabis tinctures and how to make them.” https://www.coloradopotguide.com/colorado-marijuana-blog/article/what-are-cannabis-tinctures-and-how-to-make-them/
3. “Top 5 benefits of medical cannabis tinctures.” https://unitedpatientsgroup.com/blog/2017/06/16/top-5-benefits-of-medical-cannabis-tinctures/

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